Oil

Taking a Look at Colombia's Peace Deal Post Plebiscite

boz (James Bosworth, Southern Pulse CEO): Hi everyone

boz: On 2 October, a plebiscite on the Colombian government's peace process with the FARC failed by a very narrow margin. The government and FARC had already signed the agreement and the FARC were moving towards demobilization. The past three weeks since the referendum have been a flurry of activity as the government has worked to rescue the peace agreement and the “no” side lead by former President Uribe has tried to figure out how to manage their stunning upset victory.

We’re going to chat for the next half hour or so about the peace process after the no vote and what it means for Colombia’s future. Let me start with the first obvious question: Will Santos be able to save the peace process?

Networked Notes - 12 April 2016

Keiko Fujimori’s campaign was prepared and eager to take on Veronica Mendoza in a second round battle. Mendoza’s candidacy would have allowed Fujimori to use the same playbook that helped Garcia to defeat Humala in 2006, with a network of activists both in Peru and abroad already starting to link her to Venezuela’s PSUV and Hugo Chavez. Whether true or not, Mendoza’s candidacy in the second round would have shifted the narrative of the election.

The Oil and Gas Sector in Macri’s Argentina

Against the backdrop of tumbling gas prices around the world (FT), Argentina’s Yacimientos Petrolíferos Fiscales (YPF) increased its shale oil production from the Vaca Muerta fields over the last year from 44,000 to 50,000 barrels per day. As the Wall Street Journal pointed out, Argentina’s domestic oil prices are at $67 a barrel versus the international price that hovers around $40 per barrel (WTI 39.91 and Brent $40.54 on 21 March), shielding YFP and its partners from the effects of the global dip in prices. In 2015, YFP increased spending by 4 percent instead of cutting spending -- other international companies cut as much as 20 to 40 percent.